Happy Holidays – Why?

Posted on December 13, 2014 · Posted in Current Events, Holidays, Worldview


Happy Holidays is the sensitive, politically correct, caring greeting to offer from Thanksgiving Day until Happy Holiday Day. After Happy Holliday Day then it is fine form to actually say Happy New Year. No one seems to be offended at the prospect of celebrating parties, drunkenness and the fleeting hope that next year will be better than this year.

Of course saying Happy Thanksgiving is becoming problematic because someone might think you are thankful to the God of the Bible. Thus, to avoid to avoid confusion, giving offense and a possible lawsuit it is just easier to say Happy Holidays.

Therefore, to offer a truly happy, non-offensive greeting all you have to do is to avoid the mention of anything that might possibly be a reference to Jesus Christ.

But, then it is fair to ask why should anyone be happy if God and his Son are not the reason for being happy. During the holidays people eat too much, spend money on friends and relatives they don’t even like, go into debt for things that will end up in the landfill, have hangovers and bad memories. What is happy about that?

You see the attempt to disconnect God from the holiday season actually leads to despair. In this politically correct world, the only logical response to someone wishing you Happy Holidays is why?

Of course you do have the reason to celebrate and know true happiness. You have the sure promise that your sins are forgiven. You know that despite all of the problems in life, that your God works everything for your good and his glory. Your gifts are expressions of love and gratitude, not attempts to buy affection. You know that happiness is more than what happens to us.

Look for every opportunity this Christmas season to tell others why your Christmas is a Merry Christmas. There really is a reason to be happy!

Jay Younts
Jay Younts is the Shepherd Press blogger. He is the author of Everyday Talk and other materials on parenting. He has been teaching and speaking on parenting issues for 30 years. Jay and his wife, Ruth, live in Fountain Inn, South Carolina. He serves as a ruling elder at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Moore, South Carolina. He and Ruth have five adult children.