Your teenager is caught in the tug-of-war of life

Posted on January 9, 2017 · Posted in Communication, Teenagers

tug-of-war-teenager

It is important not to miss the struggles your teenager faces each day. She is often functioning without immediate and constant parental supervision. New and sometimes dangerous influences enter his life. This is the scary part. It is no secret that sex, drugs, pornography, bullying and gambling have all made their way into the teenage world. So what can you do to shepherd your teenager without giving them a lie detector test each afternoon and attaching a body cam and GPS to them?

Here is one answer:
Become an epic listener!

Here are some practical ways to become an epic listener:
Fall in love with Proverbs 18:13. Don’t form responses in your mind or with your words until you have heard all that your teenager has to say.

Listen for what is not said, in addition to what is said.

Realize that when you are in talk mode, listening skills are severely limited.

Anticipate the challenges your children face each day. Know their test schedules, what their friendships are like, what their personal fears and struggles are like. By doing this, you may not have to ask “is anything wrong” quite so much.
Let your teenager know frequently that you are thankful for him, whether he has had a good day or not. Not many people want to talk to someone who does not delight in them.

Carefully consider what you will say before opening your mouth. Will your words be truly helpful or just pointing out what is painfully obvious?

If your child knows that he will be heard, that he is understood, that he won’t be shut down, that he is respected and cared for, then he will be more likely to turn to you when he is caught in the tug-of-war of life.

Trust God’s Spirit and become an epic listener!

Shepherding a Child's Heart

Jay Younts
Jay Younts is the Shepherd Press blogger. He is the author of Everyday Talk and other materials on parenting. He has been teaching and speaking on parenting issues for 30 years. Jay and his wife, Ruth, live in Fountain Inn, South Carolina. He serves as a ruling elder at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Moore, South Carolina. He and Ruth have five adult children.