Thought for the Lord’s Day

Posted on August 10, 2014 · Posted in Worship
Worship is not for the strong!We humans often think we can take care of ourselves. We like to appear as if we have it all together. We don’t want to appear as if we are in need. We like to think that if we work hard we will be fine. We don’t want to be vulnerable in our relationships. However, the truth is that these attitudes will keep us from the worship of our God!

When Jesus calls for the weary and burdened to come to him, we tend to think that he is speaking to the poor and disadvantaged of the world. That would be accurate as long as we include ourselves among the poor and disadvantaged. You see, even if your name is Gates, Buffett, or Murdoch, you are still in great need. Your riches are tawdry and insignificant; they can vanish in the blink of an eye. The most wealthy and powerful on the planet remain so only as long as God wills. They are no more immune from the power of God than Nebuchadnezzar was centuries ago. Their resources are not the least bit impressive to God. If this is true for the elite and powerful it is also true for you and me.

To be fit for worship I must first be honest with God. I am weak, weary and burdened. I need rest and refreshment. I don’t have it all together. I am vulnerable. I cannot take care of myself. I have no hope but the sustaining power of Jesus Christ. To be ready for worship I must eagerly respond to his call in Matthew. In humility I must see that he is calling to me. Praise God that he does, for I am a man of unclean lips with no hope except for the gracious call of my Savior.

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” Mathew 11:28-30

Jay Younts
Jay Younts is the Shepherd Press blogger. He is the author of Everyday Talk and other materials on parenting. He has been teaching and speaking on parenting issues for 30 years. Jay and his wife, Ruth, live in Fountain Inn, South Carolina. He serves as a ruling elder at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Moore, South Carolina. He and Ruth have five adult children.