Thought for the Lord’s Day

Posted on October 26, 2014 · Posted in Gospel, Worship

How often do you think about your rescue?


Years ago, I pulled a lifeless body off the bottom of a pool. The young man was a friend and a top-notch swimmer who had passed out underwater. I was the lifeguard responsible for the afternoon watch at a large pool at a Y in Miami. I noticed he was laying motionless underwater. The other guards were not paying attention because of this young man’s known excellence in the water. But I knew something was wrong, so I yelled to the other guards, dove in and lifted him up to waiting hands which successfully performed CPR.  


Over 10 years later I ran into my friend unexpectedly in downtown Miami. He immediately ran up to me, all smiles and full of gratitude. He bought lunch for us. He kept saying how thankful he was for being rescued. He knew that only a precious few seconds had stood between death and rescue that day in the pool. 


I thought of this incident as I was reading in Colossians about my own rescue from darkness.  Like my friend, I hadn’t asked to be rescued. I, too, was dead without hope. But then a King gave his life for me and I was rescued from darkness and brought into the true light of Christ. But most days I tend to forget about being rescued. I unwittingly act like I have never been rescued.


If you know Christ, you too have been rescued. Are you thankful? Does your face light up when think about the King who gave his life to rescue you?



For he has rescued us from the dominion of darkness and brought us into the kingdom of the Son he loves, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.  Colossians 1:13-14

Jay Younts
Jay Younts is the Shepherd Press blogger. He is the author of Everyday Talk and other materials on parenting. He has been teaching and speaking on parenting issues for 30 years. Jay and his wife, Ruth, live in Fountain Inn, South Carolina. He serves as a ruling elder at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Moore, South Carolina. He and Ruth have five adult children.