Commanding Your Children to Praise

Posted on November 19, 2012 · Posted in Parenting

 

Parents have no problem commanding their children to obey quickly or to be kind to others. There is no dispute about teaching children that they should not hit each other or that they should respect authority.  But what about commanding your children to praise God? Does that seem a bit unusual?

 

Let’s explore this for a moment. The statement praise God is not just about saying the words praise God. Psalm 78 exhorts Israel not to hide the praiseworthy deeds of God from their children. As you read the psalm, you see that this is exactly what occurs. God’s deeds are listed so that he can be praised!

 

So, when the scriptures state “Praise God”, it is not an option to consider whether one feels like singing praise songs. It is a command to remember and relate the praiseworthy deeds of God to ourselves and others. Just as “love your neighbor as yourself” is a command, so is “praise God” a command.

 

This means it is right to include the praise of God in the instruction of your children. Refusing to praise God is an act of disobedience just as much as refusing to come when called is an act of disobedience. 

 

Praising God is not natural just as preferring others above yourself is not natural. It is a blessing that we are commanded to praise, because if we were not commanded to do so, we would not! Therefore, teaching children to praise God is part of raising them in the fear and discipline of the Lord. Praising God for who he is and what he does is something that God requires, just as much as God requires being kind and compassionate. Teach your children the praise of God. This does not guarantee salvation. But as with any other command that you give pray that God will use it to work in their hearts to move them to come to Christ by the power of his Spirit.

Jay Younts
John A. (Jay) Younts is the Shepherd Press blogger, and is a ruling elder serving at Redeemer Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church in Moore, South Carolina. He has written Everyday Talk, Everyday Talk About Sex & Marriage, Finding the Right Track, the In Touch With Paul stewardship series, and What About War. He has studied and taught about biblical childrearing for 30 years. He and his late wife Ruth have five adult children.