“Open his eyes, Lord, so that he may see.”

Posted on January 11, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized

The prophet Elisha spoke these words regarding a man with normal eyesight. He could see everything there was to see with human eyes. But, obviously, there was something important that his servant was missing. This is a lesson parents must remember. If your children believe that what is important is what they can see with their eyes then they will be severely hampered in life. 

How much time do you spend talking with your kids about the importance of what they cannot see? What is unseen is of far more importance than what we can actually see. Do your children know that you believe that? Parent, it is your job to help your children understand that what is unseen is what gives life meaning and purpose. 

You may not have Elisha around to ask God to open the unseen to you and your children. But what you do have is the Holy Spirit’s written word that tells you of the certainty of the unseen. This is important when you feel outnumbered or overwhelmed. 

Elisha’s servant was quite concerned about the size of the Aramean army that surrounded them. Elisha calmly said:

“Don’t be afraid,” the prophet answered. “Those who are with us are more than those who are with them.”

Faith is believing that the chariots of fire did not disappear when the servants eye sight returned to normal earthly vision. 

Tell your children.

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Jay Younts
John A. (Jay) Younts is the Shepherd Press blogger, and is a ruling elder serving at Redeemer Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church in Moore, South Carolina. He has written Everyday Talk, Everyday Talk About Sex & Marriage, Finding the Right Track, the In Touch With Paul stewardship series, and What About War. He has studied and taught about biblical childrearing for 30 years. He and his late wife Ruth have five adult children.