One way to talk to your kids about God

Posted on August 12, 2013 · Posted in Communication

In Matthew 16, Jesus presents his disciples with a two-part question. It is a masterful question and one that parents can use with great benefit.

Jesus asks his disciples, “who do people say that I am?” When the disciples finish giving their answers, Jesus makes the question personal. He asks, “who do you say that I am?” Peter quickly proclaims that Jesus “is the Christ, the Son of the Living God.”

This question revealed the content of Peter’s heart. You can use this two-part question effectively to help you understand your children’s thoughts. For example:

“Hey kids, what do your friends say is causing all of the damaging weather the country has been having?”

“What do you think has been causing this weather.”

Or:

“What do your teammates say about major league stars using performance enhancing drugs?”

“What do you think about PED’s?”

There are many, many possible situations that this two-part question can help you better understand your children. For this to be effective, your concern and questions must be genuine.  They should flow out of normal conversations. This is a tool to help you gather data. If you want to use this more than once, then don’t immediately correct an answer that you think is wrong. You are asking for their their opinion, don’t penalize children for doing what you asked. Rather, use the answers you receive to help plan positive ways to address your children’s thoughts and correct them if needed.

It is always a good idea to follow Christ’s example in interacting with people.

 

 

 

 

 

Sign up for our weekly newsletter! You'll get our latest blog posts, special discounts, news about upcoming resources, plus a free ebook and a chance to win our monthly $50 coupon giveaway.

Jay Younts
John A. (Jay) Younts is the Shepherd Press blogger, and is a ruling elder serving at Redeemer Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church in Moore, South Carolina. He has written Everyday Talk, Everyday Talk About Sex & Marriage, Finding the Right Track, the In Touch With Paul stewardship series, and What About War. He has studied and taught about biblical childrearing for 30 years. He and his late wife Ruth have five adult children.